Here’s a cool idea for a web form

Do you have the guts to try this? LukeW’s blog reports on a wild test online: “Mad Libs” Style Form Increases Conversion 25-40%

Beforeafter

That’s right, in split testing, the oddball “mad libs” form increased conversion 25-40% over the “normal” form.

It worked in that case. That doesn’t mean it will work for you. But it sure looks worth testing. If you do, tell us how it goes.

Thanks to queer ideas for the tip.


Comments

4 responses to “Here’s a cool idea for a web form”

  1. I like this concept a lot. The personalized approach seems to be a natural for many fundraising and nonprofit forms.
    The “order form” is so critical to the success of any direct marketing campaign (print or online). The persuasive copy and offer might be super … but if the order form is lousy you will depress response/conversion.
    Therefore anything to enhance its clarity and effectiveness is worth testing (i.e., the clarity of the form for orders, donations, sign-ups, etc.)! Fortunately A/B split tests are straightforward on the web.
    Thanks for sharing this Jeff. I’m going to dig into this idea and see what I can do with it.

  2. I like this concept a lot. The personalized approach seems to be a natural for many fundraising and nonprofit forms.
    The “order form” is so critical to the success of any direct marketing campaign (print or online). The persuasive copy and offer might be super … but if the order form is lousy you will depress response/conversion.
    Therefore anything to enhance its clarity and effectiveness is worth testing (i.e., the clarity of the form for orders, donations, sign-ups, etc.)! Fortunately A/B split tests are straightforward on the web.
    Thanks for sharing this Jeff. I’m going to dig into this idea and see what I can do with it.

  3. Michael Hodgson Avatar
    Michael Hodgson

    Ii like the look of it.
    I trust that they didn’t use the exact two forms above, as it suggests that one is asking for details about a general ‘Infiniti’, while the other is for details about a specific Chevrolet – and the differences in vehicles may account for the difference in repsonse?

  4. Michael Hodgson Avatar
    Michael Hodgson

    Ii like the look of it.
    I trust that they didn’t use the exact two forms above, as it suggests that one is asking for details about a general ‘Infiniti’, while the other is for details about a specific Chevrolet – and the differences in vehicles may account for the difference in repsonse?

Leave a Reply

What this blog is about

The future of fundraising is not about social media, online video, or SEM. It’s not about any technology, medium, or technique. It’s about donors. If you need to raise funds from donors, you need to study them, respect them, and build everything you do around them. And the future? It’s already here. More.

Blog policies

Subscribe

Get new posts by email:

About the blogger

Jeff BrooksJeff Brooks has been serving the nonprofit community for more than 35 years and blogging about it since 2005. He considers fundraising the most noble of pursuits and hopes you’ll join him in that opinion. You can reach him at jeff [at] jeff-brooks [dot] com. More.


Archives

Blogroll

Categories


Search the blog

The future of fundraising is not about social media, online video, or SEM. It’s not about any technology, medium, or technique. It’s about donors. If you need to raise funds from donors, you need to study them, respect them, and build everything you do around them. And the future? It’s already here. More.

Recent Comments

About the blogger

Jeff Brooks has been serving the nonprofit community for more than 30 years and blogging about it since 2005. He considers fundraising the most noble of pursuits and hopes you’ll join him in that opinion. You can reach him at jeff [at] jeff-brooks [dot] com.

Blog Roll

someone’s blog