The magic ingredient for nonprofit employee productivity

Here’s a cool study from the Inside Influence Report that shows how you can improve the effectiveness of your staff: A Great Recipe for Employee Productivity…in Five Easy Minutes.

The study went like this:


  1. The first group read about the personal benefits of the jobs — financial rewards and development of skills
  2. The second group read stories from the beneficiaries of the organization, describing the positive impact on their lives.
  3. A control group didn’t read anything.

Here’s what happened:

What they found was amazing. Employees in [groups #1 and #3] looked almost exactly the same after the intervention as before it in terms of amount of donation money raised and the number of pledges earned. Yet, those in [group #2] earned more than twice the number of weekly pledges (from an average of 9 to an average of 23) and more than twice the amount of weekly donation money (from an average of $1,288 to an average of $3,130).

How many other ways can you think of where giving someone information transforms their behavior for the better? It’s like magic, huh? And if you’re a nonprofit you have this magic right at your fingertips.

Never forget the power of constantly reminding nonprofit employees up and down the line — especially those in fundraising, who tend to be away from the frontlines — about the difference they’re making happen in the world.


Comments

2 responses to “The magic ingredient for nonprofit employee productivity”

  1. It isn’t surprising that real stories are far more motivational. We all love real stories – that’s why we watch movies and read books, and why we all stop and listen when someone says, “I want to tell you a story.”
    Here’s what works beautifully for finding those stories: a methodology called Appreciative Inquiry. It’s a process that will generate story telling in a positive way from within the organization – from everyone.
    I just wrote about Appreciative Inquiry in a 4 part series on: http://www.grantstation.com
    (Okay, self serving reference, but it’s there…)
    Alexandra Peters

  2. It isn’t surprising that real stories are far more motivational. We all love real stories – that’s why we watch movies and read books, and why we all stop and listen when someone says, “I want to tell you a story.”
    Here’s what works beautifully for finding those stories: a methodology called Appreciative Inquiry. It’s a process that will generate story telling in a positive way from within the organization – from everyone.
    I just wrote about Appreciative Inquiry in a 4 part series on: http://www.grantstation.com
    (Okay, self serving reference, but it’s there…)
    Alexandra Peters

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The future of fundraising is not about social media, online video, or SEM. It’s not about any technology, medium, or technique. It’s about donors. If you need to raise funds from donors, you need to study them, respect them, and build everything you do around them. And the future? It’s already here. More.

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Jeff BrooksJeff Brooks has been serving the nonprofit community for more than 35 years and blogging about it since 2005. He considers fundraising the most noble of pursuits and hopes you’ll join him in that opinion. You can reach him at jeff [at] jeff-brooks [dot] com. More.


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The future of fundraising is not about social media, online video, or SEM. It’s not about any technology, medium, or technique. It’s about donors. If you need to raise funds from donors, you need to study them, respect them, and build everything you do around them. And the future? It’s already here. More.

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Jeff Brooks has been serving the nonprofit community for more than 30 years and blogging about it since 2005. He considers fundraising the most noble of pursuits and hopes you’ll join him in that opinion. You can reach him at jeff [at] jeff-brooks [dot] com.

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