Repetition: a powerful ingredient in fundraising

Getting tired of your same old fundraising messages? Before you let your boredom drive you to change everything, read this post at Copyblogger: How Your Prospect’s Brain Becomes Your Secret Persuasion Partner.

The key point is that repetition is necessary for recognition. The human mind is keyed to pay attention to repeated messages:

Some experts say that it takes a minimum of 7 to 9 impressions for direct mail to make an impact on you, and it can take up to 56 times for an ad to enter your conscious awareness…. When you’re getting bored with your message, when you feel the urge to shake things up just to do something different, resist. Don’t throw it out just when it’s starting to work.

The downfall of many fundraising programs is that they change too often. They never build up that bank of recognition, because their creators get bored of repetition before most of the audience even starts to notice the message at all.

So keep the message consistent. Make sure you ride the response curve all the way to the top. Typically, it will eventually turn downward. That’s when you change the message.

Not when it starts to feel old to you.


Comments

2 responses to “Repetition: a powerful ingredient in fundraising”

  1. Thanks for surfacing this, Jeff.
    This theory is further supported by actual response data. A child sponsorship organization that uses DRTV once asked responders how many times they saw the TV program before calling to sponsor a child. The average usually ranged between 4 and 5 times.
    As direct marketers, we often see non-response as a necessary evil. In reality we’re sowing the seeds for future response.

  2. Thanks for surfacing this, Jeff.
    This theory is further supported by actual response data. A child sponsorship organization that uses DRTV once asked responders how many times they saw the TV program before calling to sponsor a child. The average usually ranged between 4 and 5 times.
    As direct marketers, we often see non-response as a necessary evil. In reality we’re sowing the seeds for future response.

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The future of fundraising is not about social media, online video, or SEM. It’s not about any technology, medium, or technique. It’s about donors. If you need to raise funds from donors, you need to study them, respect them, and build everything you do around them. And the future? It’s already here. More.

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Jeff BrooksJeff Brooks has been serving the nonprofit community for more than 35 years and blogging about it since 2005. He considers fundraising the most noble of pursuits and hopes you’ll join him in that opinion. You can reach him at jeff [at] jeff-brooks [dot] com. More.


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The future of fundraising is not about social media, online video, or SEM. It’s not about any technology, medium, or technique. It’s about donors. If you need to raise funds from donors, you need to study them, respect them, and build everything you do around them. And the future? It’s already here. More.

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Jeff Brooks has been serving the nonprofit community for more than 30 years and blogging about it since 2005. He considers fundraising the most noble of pursuits and hopes you’ll join him in that opinion. You can reach him at jeff [at] jeff-brooks [dot] com.

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