How to make sure bloggers don’t pay attention to you

The Damn, I Wish I Thought of That! blog asked an interesting question: Q. How do we STOP a blogger from writing about us?

The answer: Send them a canned pitch from your PR firm.

These pitches are instant turn-offs to bloggers. We get them every day. And we never write about these companies again.

Getting bloggers talking about you is a good way to spread the word. But the old-line PR approach of blasting out a snowstorm of press releases is counterproductive.

I get dumb, off-point, misdirected, press releases every day. Just about 100% of them are from PR people who clearly have never read one word of my blog. I think most bloggers have that experience and quickly develop a deep disdain for clueless PR people and their irrelevant press releases.

So if you want to get a blogger’s attention (including me), try these things:


  • Read the blog. Just a few posts will tell you what their topic is. You’d be amazed how many PR people clearly have no idea what my blog is about and send me insanely off-topic stuff. You’d think the name of the blog would clue them in to the fact that I’m not likely to post about new games or banking services.
  • Read the blog policy if they have one. (Here’s mine.) This will tell you even more about what the blogger cares about and is likely to respond to.
  • Be part of the conversation. Actually discuss your topic with the blogger. You’ll quickly find out whether what you’re pushing is a no go, or what it might take to make the blogger pick up the story. It would help to be a recognizable name from the blogger’s comments.
  • Don’t send a press release at all. Most bloggers take that as a clear sign that you’re irrelevant.
  • Most important: Do something worth talking about.


Comments

2 responses to “How to make sure bloggers don’t pay attention to you”

  1. Ok, so I’ve been reading your blog regularly over the past few months. I think I have learned a lot, and had my eyes opened a bit wider a few times. I haven’t yet been able to implement all of your suggestions, but I’m working on it 😉
    Now I have a question for you:
    I know that you are in favor of good, old-fashioned, snail-mail letters. (I never would have imagined they could be so effective until I started reading your blog.)
    We are a very small non-profit — my wife and I basically run the American side of the organization, and our brothers and sisters in Myanmar actually do the real work.
    Can you recommend a good source for example fund raising letters? I work full-time, and so I don’t have a lot of time to devote to creating this sort of thing from scratch. I need some good examples to get my creative juices flowing, if you know what I mean.
    Anything you can suggest would be great – a book, another website, etc.
    Thanks for a great blog, and I look forward to reading your response.
    Blessings,
    Charles Cherry
    Myanmar Hope Christian Mission, Inc.

  2. Ok, so I’ve been reading your blog regularly over the past few months. I think I have learned a lot, and had my eyes opened a bit wider a few times. I haven’t yet been able to implement all of your suggestions, but I’m working on it 😉
    Now I have a question for you:
    I know that you are in favor of good, old-fashioned, snail-mail letters. (I never would have imagined they could be so effective until I started reading your blog.)
    We are a very small non-profit — my wife and I basically run the American side of the organization, and our brothers and sisters in Myanmar actually do the real work.
    Can you recommend a good source for example fund raising letters? I work full-time, and so I don’t have a lot of time to devote to creating this sort of thing from scratch. I need some good examples to get my creative juices flowing, if you know what I mean.
    Anything you can suggest would be great – a book, another website, etc.
    Thanks for a great blog, and I look forward to reading your response.
    Blessings,
    Charles Cherry
    Myanmar Hope Christian Mission, Inc.

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The future of fundraising is not about social media, online video, or SEM. It’s not about any technology, medium, or technique. It’s about donors. If you need to raise funds from donors, you need to study them, respect them, and build everything you do around them. And the future? It’s already here. More.

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Jeff BrooksJeff Brooks has been serving the nonprofit community for more than 35 years and blogging about it since 2005. He considers fundraising the most noble of pursuits and hopes you’ll join him in that opinion. You can reach him at jeff [at] jeff-brooks [dot] com. More.


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The future of fundraising is not about social media, online video, or SEM. It’s not about any technology, medium, or technique. It’s about donors. If you need to raise funds from donors, you need to study them, respect them, and build everything you do around them. And the future? It’s already here. More.

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Jeff Brooks has been serving the nonprofit community for more than 30 years and blogging about it since 2005. He considers fundraising the most noble of pursuits and hopes you’ll join him in that opinion. You can reach him at jeff [at] jeff-brooks [dot] com.

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