Month: October 2011

  • The power of repetition in fundraising

    If you’ve ever thought a fundraising message was faulty because it was repetitious, you got it all wrong. Repetition is not bad in fundraising. Too Busy To Fundraise noted this recently, at How Many Times Do I Have To Tell You? Don’t think that you will irritate people if you send a series of request,…

  • Is there any “seductive” fundraising out there?

    Most marketers will not be surprised by the research reported at Neuromarketing: Don’t Sell, Seduce! It found that ads using logic to sell affected the brain differently from those that used “non-rational influence” — you know, those ads that just have some kind of beautiful photo and the name of the product. They’re usually for…

  • Does your email look like it’s from a scammer?

    A lot of the people you’re emailing think you’re a scammer. It’s nothing to do with you, especially. It’s just that there are a lot of scams out there, and people are wary. The MarketingProfs Daily Fix Blog has some advice from the commercial email world on not being seen as a scammer, at Beware…

  • How award-winning work destroys nonprofit organizations

    A few months ago I wrote about some obnoxiously stupid nonprofit marketing that won an award from D&AD, an ad-industry organization in the UK. (See Stupid nonprofit ads: garbage in, garbage out. Mark Phillips, of the excellent queer ideas blog, also commented on the same work. He was later invited to write at D&AD about…

  • A fundraising offer you can’t refuse

    From the travel blog Asia Obscura, an example of extreme fundraising from southern India: Sweet Gruesome Statue (aka “Give Cash Now”). How many donors would say no to that fundraising offer? I also wonder if the agency submitted the project with more entrails, but the client made them hold back with only a moderate display…

  • Who donors are really giving to when they give to you

    Here’s one of those important points that’s so easy to forget, from The Far Edge of Promise blog, at Giving Through: Do you ask your donors to give to your institution? Or… Do you ask your donors to give through your institution to your students, patients, clients, etc? That’s pretty much the main question you…

  • How to critique effectively

    Too often, when people critique fundraising messages, they talk in the first person. They make it seem as if the critiquer is a donor telling her story of her interactions with the piece and why it did or didn’t work. These critiques are full of phrases like these: I don’t like it. That confuses me.…

  • Researchers also discovered that water is wet

    Wow. Some researchers at the University of Colorado at Boulder have really hit it out of the park with this one: When it comes to charitable giving, people respond to their immediate emotions. They painstakingly uncovered what any fundraiser who usually does their work while awake has always known: When considering giving money to humanitarian…

  • Restraint: the quick path to losing donors

    Survey research could kill your fundraising. Here’s an example, from Burk’s Blog: The Profitability of Restraint. This is an extreme use of qualitative research that leads to unsupportable conclusions. Namely, in this case, that the top reason donors stop giving is “over-solicitation.” … donors feel bombarded, and their giving patterns reflect their growing frustration. Today,…