Are you making donors glad they gave?

Do you really make it worth your donors’ money to give to you? That’s the question at a recent post at Queer Ideas: Why giving to charity can be like buying a Polaris submarine. (You’ll have to go read the post to learn how a submarine comes into this topic.)

The point is this: Most of the time, what happens after a donor gives to a nonprofit is just not all that cool:

Instead of being invited to be part of something life changing, I get a polite and formal letter that informs me that my money has gone in to a big pot and will do something good, somewhere at some point in the future.

What could you do to really thrill your donors, to make them feel the importance of their giving?

What would make them say “Giving that gift was the best thing I’ve done in a long time!”

What would make them feel more powerful, more connected, more happy about their life?

If you aren’t doing that, you really aren’t a fundraiser yet.

Think about it.


Comments

6 responses to “Are you making donors glad they gave?”

  1. Great point. I recently blogged on subject of thank you letters http://clairification.blogspot.com/2012/01/what-would-miss-manners-say-thank-you.html and agree it’s the most important tool in our arsenal. Thanks!

  2. Great point. I recently blogged on subject of thank you letters http://clairification.blogspot.com/2012/01/what-would-miss-manners-say-thank-you.html and agree it’s the most important tool in our arsenal. Thanks!

  3. While the truth is likely that the donation is going to a large pot, it is equally as useful to let the donor know what his/her $25 donation could be doing, i.e. with $25 you can send 2 kids to school for a month, or provide medical screenings for a woman and her family. Being transparent in that regard gives the donor the feeling that a) their money is being used and b) their money is needed specific people.

  4. While the truth is likely that the donation is going to a large pot, it is equally as useful to let the donor know what his/her $25 donation could be doing, i.e. with $25 you can send 2 kids to school for a month, or provide medical screenings for a woman and her family. Being transparent in that regard gives the donor the feeling that a) their money is being used and b) their money is needed specific people.

  5. VERY IMPORTANT TOPIC FOR PEOPLE TO PONDER ON!

  6. VERY IMPORTANT TOPIC FOR PEOPLE TO PONDER ON!

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The future of fundraising is not about social media, online video, or SEM. It’s not about any technology, medium, or technique. It’s about donors. If you need to raise funds from donors, you need to study them, respect them, and build everything you do around them. And the future? It’s already here. More.

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Jeff BrooksJeff Brooks has been serving the nonprofit community for more than 35 years and blogging about it since 2005. He considers fundraising the most noble of pursuits and hopes you’ll join him in that opinion. You can reach him at jeff [at] jeff-brooks [dot] com. More.


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The future of fundraising is not about social media, online video, or SEM. It’s not about any technology, medium, or technique. It’s about donors. If you need to raise funds from donors, you need to study them, respect them, and build everything you do around them. And the future? It’s already here. More.

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Jeff Brooks has been serving the nonprofit community for more than 30 years and blogging about it since 2005. He considers fundraising the most noble of pursuits and hopes you’ll join him in that opinion. You can reach him at jeff [at] jeff-brooks [dot] com.

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