How to make your landing page a place that welcomes people

Have you ever walked into a store and immediately backed out because the place was a random mess, blaring music that was hostile to you, and you couldn’t figure out where you should go?

A lot of nonprofit landing pages are like that.

And that’s a big problem. Because more and more donors give online — and not any other way. If your landing page isn’t welcoming, clear, and easy — you are losing more money than you can count.

The Bad Language has some help, at 15 ways to improve your home page.

Here are most of them:


  • Attractive things are perceived as being easier to use.
  • Consistency: do not divorce your homepage from the branding on the rest of your site.
  • Less is more.
  • Keep your ideas simple.
  • Think twice before including an automatically launching video — there’s a high likelihood visitors will click away to stop the video.
  • Have the most important information clearly visible at the top: your contact information.
  • Make it obvious what you do.
  • Tell them how you can help them.
  • If you want visitors to scroll, let them know there is something to see.
  • Load time is still critical.
  • Employ responsive web-design so your site is readable no matter what device your visitor is using.


Comments

2 responses to “How to make your landing page a place that welcomes people”

  1. Great post Jeff! Just wanted add some incites here… We have tested hundreds (if not thousands of landing pages) and one thing we have found that consistently works is to eliminate traditional web navigation from the top of the page. In other words, while the branding (look and feel) should be congruent with your other pages (although this is not 100% true either), it is important that you “squeeze” the prospect into a “conversion”. You can only generate leads (or gifts) if you prohibit surfing around. If you feel you need more than one page to make your case, create a micro-site or thrown in some drop-downs. But do your best to prevent folks from surfing all over your website.
    Bottom line… test everything!

  2. Great post Jeff! Just wanted add some incites here… We have tested hundreds (if not thousands of landing pages) and one thing we have found that consistently works is to eliminate traditional web navigation from the top of the page. In other words, while the branding (look and feel) should be congruent with your other pages (although this is not 100% true either), it is important that you “squeeze” the prospect into a “conversion”. You can only generate leads (or gifts) if you prohibit surfing around. If you feel you need more than one page to make your case, create a micro-site or thrown in some drop-downs. But do your best to prevent folks from surfing all over your website.
    Bottom line… test everything!

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The future of fundraising is not about social media, online video, or SEM. It’s not about any technology, medium, or technique. It’s about donors. If you need to raise funds from donors, you need to study them, respect them, and build everything you do around them. And the future? It’s already here. More.

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Jeff BrooksJeff Brooks has been serving the nonprofit community for more than 35 years and blogging about it since 2005. He considers fundraising the most noble of pursuits and hopes you’ll join him in that opinion. You can reach him at jeff [at] jeff-brooks [dot] com. More.


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The future of fundraising is not about social media, online video, or SEM. It’s not about any technology, medium, or technique. It’s about donors. If you need to raise funds from donors, you need to study them, respect them, and build everything you do around them. And the future? It’s already here. More.

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About the blogger

Jeff Brooks has been serving the nonprofit community for more than 30 years and blogging about it since 2005. He considers fundraising the most noble of pursuits and hopes you’ll join him in that opinion. You can reach him at jeff [at] jeff-brooks [dot] com.