Why your fundraising brand should bore you

One of the hard things about smart fundraising is that you can drive yourself crazy from the repetition. Because repetition is one of the keys to success: Repetition within every project (you need to say the offer over and over and over again) and repetition over the course of months and years (you need to keep saying what you do a thousand times before people start to notice.

Which is why Damn, I Wish I’d Thought of That! posted recently on Why great brands are boring:

Resist the urge to change your marketing every month. Don’t change your look, theme, or logo because you’re bored. Building a brand takes time and consistency. You need to build familiarity for years and years until everyone knows who you are and what you stand for.

So many great fundraising campaigns have been abandoned when those in charge suddenly proclaimed them old and tired — not because the campaigns were old and tired, but because those in charge were just sick of them.

Your boredom with your fundraising is no indicator at all that it is boring. The real fundraising professional doesn’t try to entertain herself, but reach donors. And donors aren’t paying enough attention to get bored.

If you’re serious about raising funds, you’ll be okay with a little — a lot — of repetition.


Comments

2 responses to “Why your fundraising brand should bore you”

  1. I found this post interesting, because most communication and information is 24/7 now that the Internet and technology is constantly changing. We expect people to want something new everyday. As members of society, we almost expect to see something new and innovative from organizations and companies every day. However, after reading this article and taking a step back to think about this practically, boring really does make sense. New laundry detergent is being invented and marketed every day, yet I still continue to use Tide because that’s what my mother used for the 18 years I was in the house. It’s a brand I know, trust, and recognize because of repetition. While this is an example that doesn’t pertain to fundraising it’s applicable for nonprofit fundraising. People trust organizations with credibility. An organization builds credibility through consistency and reliability. It’s not to say that an organization can’t be innovative, but they should be innovative in content rather than imaging, theme, branding or essentially the organizations identity. Once the identity is established, the organization should add to it, not take from or change it. The same is true for campaigns and effective methods of communication such as social media platforms. Organizations should keep their social media platforms consistent as far as theme, identity, and branding goes. They should use the content as an opportunity for improvement to quality and innovation.

  2. I found this post interesting, because most communication and information is 24/7 now that the Internet and technology is constantly changing. We expect people to want something new everyday. As members of society, we almost expect to see something new and innovative from organizations and companies every day. However, after reading this article and taking a step back to think about this practically, boring really does make sense. New laundry detergent is being invented and marketed every day, yet I still continue to use Tide because that’s what my mother used for the 18 years I was in the house. It’s a brand I know, trust, and recognize because of repetition. While this is an example that doesn’t pertain to fundraising it’s applicable for nonprofit fundraising. People trust organizations with credibility. An organization builds credibility through consistency and reliability. It’s not to say that an organization can’t be innovative, but they should be innovative in content rather than imaging, theme, branding or essentially the organizations identity. Once the identity is established, the organization should add to it, not take from or change it. The same is true for campaigns and effective methods of communication such as social media platforms. Organizations should keep their social media platforms consistent as far as theme, identity, and branding goes. They should use the content as an opportunity for improvement to quality and innovation.

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The future of fundraising is not about social media, online video, or SEM. It’s not about any technology, medium, or technique. It’s about donors. If you need to raise funds from donors, you need to study them, respect them, and build everything you do around them. And the future? It’s already here. More.

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Jeff BrooksJeff Brooks has been serving the nonprofit community for more than 35 years and blogging about it since 2005. He considers fundraising the most noble of pursuits and hopes you’ll join him in that opinion. You can reach him at jeff [at] jeff-brooks [dot] com. More.


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The future of fundraising is not about social media, online video, or SEM. It’s not about any technology, medium, or technique. It’s about donors. If you need to raise funds from donors, you need to study them, respect them, and build everything you do around them. And the future? It’s already here. More.

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About the blogger

Jeff Brooks has been serving the nonprofit community for more than 30 years and blogging about it since 2005. He considers fundraising the most noble of pursuits and hopes you’ll join him in that opinion. You can reach him at jeff [at] jeff-brooks [dot] com.