Put your nonprofit website to work for you

If your website isn’t persuading people to donate — or at least give you their email address — it’s not doing its job.

The HubSpot Marketing Blog has some hints for getting your website to work at How to Write Compelling Copy: 7 Tips for Writing Content That Converts:

  1. Get to know your target prospect. (Know your donors — their demographics and psychographics. And connect with them on their territory!”)
  2. Exploit the psychology of exclusivity. (Donors need to know that their gift matters, that if they don’t step up and be a hero … who else will?)
  3. Make it emotional.
  4. Draw analogies and metaphors. (Great analogies make your points clearer and more compelling.)
  5. Avoid weasel words. (“Your gift can help us do the work” — that’s weasel talk. Put the action in the donors’ hands.)
  6. Create urgency. (Why is giving right now important? Later means never for most donors.)
  7. Tailor your CTA. (Go beyond DONATE. Make your calls to action really state action.)

Put these things to work and help turn your website into an action center, not just an expensive digital doorstop.


Comments

2 responses to “Put your nonprofit website to work for you”

  1. Providing documents to show the real long term costs associated with running the organization can help to generate donor funds. A Reserve Study is a budgeting tool utilized by Non-Profits for the long term repair & replacement of building components and assets. Many organizations provide donors with annual budget requirements but do not include the long term expenses related to the building deterioration and repair projects which are infrequent but extremely costly.

  2. Providing documents to show the real long term costs associated with running the organization can help to generate donor funds. A Reserve Study is a budgeting tool utilized by Non-Profits for the long term repair & replacement of building components and assets. Many organizations provide donors with annual budget requirements but do not include the long term expenses related to the building deterioration and repair projects which are infrequent but extremely costly.

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The future of fundraising is not about social media, online video, or SEM. It’s not about any technology, medium, or technique. It’s about donors. If you need to raise funds from donors, you need to study them, respect them, and build everything you do around them. And the future? It’s already here. More.

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Jeff BrooksJeff Brooks has been serving the nonprofit community for more than 35 years and blogging about it since 2005. He considers fundraising the most noble of pursuits and hopes you’ll join him in that opinion. You can reach him at jeff [at] jeff-brooks [dot] com. More.


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The future of fundraising is not about social media, online video, or SEM. It’s not about any technology, medium, or technique. It’s about donors. If you need to raise funds from donors, you need to study them, respect them, and build everything you do around them. And the future? It’s already here. More.

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About the blogger

Jeff Brooks has been serving the nonprofit community for more than 30 years and blogging about it since 2005. He considers fundraising the most noble of pursuits and hopes you’ll join him in that opinion. You can reach him at jeff [at] jeff-brooks [dot] com.

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