How to inspire repeat gifts from your donors

It’s hard to get someone to make a donation. It’s even harder — and more important — to get them to give two gifts.

It’s all in the follow-up. Get Fully Funded has some help, at 4 Keys to Keeping Happy Donors and Repeat Gifts:

  1. They want to be thanked and appreciated.
  2. They want to feel good about their giving experience.
  3. They want to know how you used their money.
  4. They want to trust your nonprofit.

If you satisfy these needs for your donors, you will see retention rates go up.

A lot of people — a painfully high portion of them — think your organization and fundraising are a scam.

That’s because there really are scams out there. But worse, a lot of perfectly good organizations act exactly like scammers. They don’t thank their donors. Or they thank so sloppily that it’s almost worse than not at all. And they don’t even try to show donors that their giving makes a difference.

Any organization that fails to thank and report back to donors deserves the terrible retention they get as a result.

But it’s worse than that: They’re giving fundraising in general a bad name. Training people to think there’s a lot more scams than there really are. They’re helping build a huge barrier to giving that hurts everyone.

If you respect your donors, yourself, your cause, and the whole enterprise of charitable giving — you’ll treat your donors right.


Comments

2 responses to “How to inspire repeat gifts from your donors”

  1. When I read this post, I immediately looked on the wall next to my desk to read (for the thousandth time) my Nine Principals of Keeping Sponsors. Your blog and my nine principals are quite similar. My wife and I took over this charity called World’s Children in 2009 when it was floundering and looked like it might sink. It is a relatively small, child-sponsoring charity initially begun by my parents in 1965. Almost immediately after taking it over I wrote my nine principals and I have every new employee read them and I have them posted conspicuously throughout the office. We rarely lose sponsors, and when we do it is usually because of death or financial difficulties. I attribute that retention to our following these principals in all our communications. You are free to share them if you so desire. The other thing we do is to send photos and a personal letter of thanks from an orphanage administrator to people who made donations toward projects to improve conditions in the orphanages. They see exactly how their money was spent and they give year after year for things like beds and mattresses, borewells, mosquito screens, toilet repairs, new roofs, and even for major construction projects in the orphanages. I enjoy your blog posts!

  2. When I read this post, I immediately looked on the wall next to my desk to read (for the thousandth time) my Nine Principals of Keeping Sponsors. Your blog and my nine principals are quite similar. My wife and I took over this charity called World’s Children in 2009 when it was floundering and looked like it might sink. It is a relatively small, child-sponsoring charity initially begun by my parents in 1965. Almost immediately after taking it over I wrote my nine principals and I have every new employee read them and I have them posted conspicuously throughout the office. We rarely lose sponsors, and when we do it is usually because of death or financial difficulties. I attribute that retention to our following these principals in all our communications. You are free to share them if you so desire. The other thing we do is to send photos and a personal letter of thanks from an orphanage administrator to people who made donations toward projects to improve conditions in the orphanages. They see exactly how their money was spent and they give year after year for things like beds and mattresses, borewells, mosquito screens, toilet repairs, new roofs, and even for major construction projects in the orphanages. I enjoy your blog posts!

Leave a Reply

What this blog is about

The future of fundraising is not about social media, online video, or SEM. It’s not about any technology, medium, or technique. It’s about donors. If you need to raise funds from donors, you need to study them, respect them, and build everything you do around them. And the future? It’s already here. More.

Blog policies

Subscribe

Get new posts by email:

About the blogger

Jeff BrooksJeff Brooks has been serving the nonprofit community for more than 35 years and blogging about it since 2005. He considers fundraising the most noble of pursuits and hopes you’ll join him in that opinion. You can reach him at jeff [at] jeff-brooks [dot] com. More.


Archives

Blogroll

Categories


Search the blog

The future of fundraising is not about social media, online video, or SEM. It’s not about any technology, medium, or technique. It’s about donors. If you need to raise funds from donors, you need to study them, respect them, and build everything you do around them. And the future? It’s already here. More.

Recent Comments

About the blogger

Jeff Brooks has been serving the nonprofit community for more than 30 years and blogging about it since 2005. He considers fundraising the most noble of pursuits and hopes you’ll join him in that opinion. You can reach him at jeff [at] jeff-brooks [dot] com.

Blog Roll

someone’s blog