How to position yourself to make “rage giving” into donor relationships

You’ve heard about rage giving — where people respond to political outrages by supporting nonprofits they hope will defend against those outrages.

It’s been a real windfall for some organizations that are positioned as defenders against President Trump.

If you’re working in one of the areas that can be seen as defending, you might be getting some rage gifts too.

Are you ready?

Wired Impact asks, Rage Donations: Is Your Nonprofit Ready for this New Trend?

An important part of this post was about what you do with those new rage donors:

Create a donor retention plan that will keep your rage donation audience engaged and informed in the long-term. Consider a follow-up plan beyond your normal IRS receipts such as newsletter articles, videos, blog posts and social media updates about the issue and the impact of the gifts.

If your organization is getting rage donations, you should think of this time as a sort of ongoing “disaster.”

Many of the gifts are from people who aren’t your typical donors: Younger, less connected, much less inclined to stick with you when things return to “normal.”

Rage donors will likely have a lower than normal retention rate. You can’t change that, but you can tip it in your favor by making sure those new donors feel rewarded and valued.

If you treat them right, you’ll bring in some new friends, and all that rage can amount to more than just a momentary “fad.”


Comments

2 responses to “How to position yourself to make “rage giving” into donor relationships”

  1. Hi Jeff – I’m happy to see that the rage donations post caught your eye. Thanks for sharing this topic with your readers! It will be interesting to see what the retention rate looks like for the groups on the receiving end of these gifts, especially broken out by donor demographics.

  2. Hi Jeff – I’m happy to see that the rage donations post caught your eye. Thanks for sharing this topic with your readers! It will be interesting to see what the retention rate looks like for the groups on the receiving end of these gifts, especially broken out by donor demographics.

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The future of fundraising is not about social media, online video, or SEM. It’s not about any technology, medium, or technique. It’s about donors. If you need to raise funds from donors, you need to study them, respect them, and build everything you do around them. And the future? It’s already here. More.

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Jeff BrooksJeff Brooks has been serving the nonprofit community for more than 35 years and blogging about it since 2005. He considers fundraising the most noble of pursuits and hopes you’ll join him in that opinion. You can reach him at jeff [at] jeff-brooks [dot] com. More.


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The future of fundraising is not about social media, online video, or SEM. It’s not about any technology, medium, or technique. It’s about donors. If you need to raise funds from donors, you need to study them, respect them, and build everything you do around them. And the future? It’s already here. More.

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Jeff Brooks has been serving the nonprofit community for more than 30 years and blogging about it since 2005. He considers fundraising the most noble of pursuits and hopes you’ll join him in that opinion. You can reach him at jeff [at] jeff-brooks [dot] com.

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