Improve fundraising results by asking for weird-sized gifts

Here’s a weird but very effective fundraising secret: Instead of asking your donors to give tidy amounts divisible by five or ten, ask oddball amounts.

It can improve average gift and/or response rate.

Here’s a great explanation from Bloomerang, at The Pique Technique — How It Can Enhance Your Fundraising Ask Strings (“pique technique” because it’s designed to pique their interest).

Three ways to employ odd ask amounts:

  1. Impact: “$17 will provide clean water for one child for a week”, “$119 will provide a clean water well for one village”
  2. Cultural/Historical: “$29 representing the 29 million people suffering from diabetes”
  3. Data-Driven: derived from a statistical analysis of your donor’s behavior

It’s surprisingly effective. Try it.

There are a lot more tidbits of fundraising knowledge like that, some of them exactly right for you. Want to find out more? Click here to schedule a free 25 minute session with me. Tell me what’s up with your fundraising, and I can help you techniques and approaches that motivate more donors to give.


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The future of fundraising is not about social media, online video, or SEM. It’s not about any technology, medium, or technique. It’s about donors. If you need to raise funds from donors, you need to study them, respect them, and build everything you do around them. And the future? It’s already here. More.

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Jeff BrooksJeff Brooks has been serving the nonprofit community for more than 35 years and blogging about it since 2005. He considers fundraising the most noble of pursuits and hopes you’ll join him in that opinion. You can reach him at jeff [at] jeff-brooks [dot] com. More.


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The future of fundraising is not about social media, online video, or SEM. It’s not about any technology, medium, or technique. It’s about donors. If you need to raise funds from donors, you need to study them, respect them, and build everything you do around them. And the future? It’s already here. More.

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About the blogger

Jeff Brooks has been serving the nonprofit community for more than 30 years and blogging about it since 2005. He considers fundraising the most noble of pursuits and hopes you’ll join him in that opinion. You can reach him at jeff [at] jeff-brooks [dot] com.

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