How not to lose your donors from that donation page you worked so hard to get them to

A lot of success comes from doing a ton of small things right. That’s especially true when you’re raising funds online. That’s why this post at The Daily Egg — 19 Form Design Best Practices to Get More Conversions — is so useful. It’s a long and very detailed post with many examples, so give yourself time to pay attention to it!

  1. Reduce friction (technical problems, unclear instructions, complicated forms)
  2. Create a beautifully designed form
  3. Only add fields you need (asking for information you don’t actually need turns people away)
  4. Test multi-step forms against single-step forms
  5. Single-column design is best for readability
  6. Position the messages on the right places (test and find out what people do with your forms)
  7. Start with the easy questions
  8. Add auto-format
  9. Allow copy and paste
  10. Add a clear CTA message (don’t make it “Submit”!)
  11. The CTA button must have a contrasting color (despite what your brand cops think)
  12. A/B test the call-to-action buttons
  13. Indicate when a field is optional
  14. Don’t slice fields (that is, don’t divide the phone number field into two parts or the credit card into four)
  15. Avoid captchas
  16. Guide your user to the right answer
  17. Add contact information or a chat
  18. Use a progress bar when there’re too many fields
  19. Never use a “Reset Form” button

Want help with your online fundraising? I’m available for free 25-minute coaching sessions. Just click here and directly schedule an online conversation with me or with Sean Triner.


Comments

2 responses to “How not to lose your donors from that donation page you worked so hard to get them to”

  1. Great list! I agree with the friction reduction and focus on simplicity. Narrowing your focus on these forms can go a long way. Anything to make it easy for the visitor to take the next step!
    Thanks for putting this together.

  2. Great list! I agree with the friction reduction and focus on simplicity. Narrowing your focus on these forms can go a long way. Anything to make it easy for the visitor to take the next step!
    Thanks for putting this together.

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The future of fundraising is not about social media, online video, or SEM. It’s not about any technology, medium, or technique. It’s about donors. If you need to raise funds from donors, you need to study them, respect them, and build everything you do around them. And the future? It’s already here. More.

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Jeff BrooksJeff Brooks has been serving the nonprofit community for more than 35 years and blogging about it since 2005. He considers fundraising the most noble of pursuits and hopes you’ll join him in that opinion. You can reach him at jeff [at] jeff-brooks [dot] com. More.


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The future of fundraising is not about social media, online video, or SEM. It’s not about any technology, medium, or technique. It’s about donors. If you need to raise funds from donors, you need to study them, respect them, and build everything you do around them. And the future? It’s already here. More.

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Jeff Brooks has been serving the nonprofit community for more than 30 years and blogging about it since 2005. He considers fundraising the most noble of pursuits and hopes you’ll join him in that opinion. You can reach him at jeff [at] jeff-brooks [dot] com.

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