7 self-defeating attitudes that might be squashing your fundraising

The roots of fundraising failure almost always start in the attitudes and beliefs of those raising funds.

The best way to overcome those self-imposed limits is to recognize them. Here’s a post at the Bloomerang Blog that pinpoints some of them: 7 Limiting Beliefs in Fundraising You Need to Remove Today So You Can Raise More. Are any of these holding you back?

  1. It takes money to raise money. True, but too often used as an excuse for failure. Do what you can with what you have. That might mean find ways to grow organically within your community, using digital and personal approaches. Have goals, a strategy to reach them, and stick to it. Eventually, you’ll have money to make more money.
  2. Money is the root of all evil. Many of us have complicated relationships with money. That’s probably why this saying from the Bible is so often misquoted (it’ s “love of money”). Fundraising is only incidentally about money — it’s really about giving donors a way to put their values into action. Think of it that way if you struggle with money.
  3. There’s only so much money for fundraising. This is the scarcity mindset, the belief that donors get “tapped out” and stop giving. It’s not at all what happens in real life, but if you decide for donors that they’re tapped out, you won’t get anything from them.
  4. You can’t raise more money in a crisis. This belief is bankrupting many organizations right now. They decided that donors can’t or won’t or shouldn’t give during a crisis. What really happened has been donors have responded to pandemic-related fundraising with record-breaking generosity. A crisis is among the best times for raising money.
  5. It is better to give than to receive. True. And it should encourage you to raise money with more confidence. Donors receive incredible blessings by donating.
  6. We don’t know the right people to raise big dollars. Actually you already know the big-dollar people. They just haven’t given the big dollars to you yet. More than 90% of major donors start their giving with much smaller gifts, mostly through direct mail. They rise to major donor status when you treat them well and show them that their giving makes a difference.
  7. Raising money is hard. Also true. But everybody’s job is hard. The winners are those who tackle the hard stuff. They discover it’s not as hard as they thought.


Comments

Leave a Reply

What this blog is about

The future of fundraising is not about social media, online video, or SEM. It’s not about any technology, medium, or technique. It’s about donors. If you need to raise funds from donors, you need to study them, respect them, and build everything you do around them. And the future? It’s already here. More.

Blog policies

Subscribe

Get new posts by email:

About the blogger

Jeff BrooksJeff Brooks has been serving the nonprofit community for more than 35 years and blogging about it since 2005. He considers fundraising the most noble of pursuits and hopes you’ll join him in that opinion. You can reach him at jeff [at] jeff-brooks [dot] com. More.


Archives

Blogroll

Categories


Search the blog

The future of fundraising is not about social media, online video, or SEM. It’s not about any technology, medium, or technique. It’s about donors. If you need to raise funds from donors, you need to study them, respect them, and build everything you do around them. And the future? It’s already here. More.

Recent Comments

About the blogger

Jeff Brooks has been serving the nonprofit community for more than 30 years and blogging about it since 2005. He considers fundraising the most noble of pursuits and hopes you’ll join him in that opinion. You can reach him at jeff [at] jeff-brooks [dot] com.

Blog Roll

someone’s blog